Marmite, staple of the British breakfast table may become banned in Denmark because it contains added vitamins and minerals.

We have no record of an application for the sale of the product, so we have neither forbidden or accepted it.

The spread is high in B vitamins and fortified with folic acid.

There have been widespread reports that Danish authorities have forced it off shop shelves for fear of people exceeding “safe levels” of nutrients although many commentators see this as a hoax and another clever matrketing ploy form the Marmite marketing team.

Also on Denmark’s danger list are Horlicks and Ovaltine, along with Farley’s Rusks, Vegemite and cereals fortified with B vitamins.

All of them are banned under legislation passed in 2004 restricting the sales of foods with added vitamins, but until now Marmite – only on sale in the country for around five years – had not been noticed by the regulators.

A spokesman for the Danish Food and Veterinary Administration said: “We have no record of an application for the sale of the product, so we have neither forbidden or accepted it.”